Positions Available: 2021 Seasonal Field Technicians

Field work in the Sierra Nevada: A researcher collects a skin swab sample from an endangered frog.
A researcher collects a skin swab sample from an endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog for disease diagnostics.

We seek individuals with passion for conservation and research in challenging conditions, and extensive mountain experience. Follow the link for a detailed job description and application instructions.

https://mountainlakesresearch.com/wp-content/uploads/JobDescription_2021.pdf

Over the past quarter century, we have documented dramatic, disease-driven declines of mountain yellow-legged frogs across California’s Sierra Nevada. Recently we have documented the beginning of their recovery. To study these declines and recovery in 2021, we will hire two field technicians for the summer field work. As part of our team, the technicians will primarily conduct frog population surveys, disease surveys, and translocations/reintroductions. Our study sites are lakes, ponds, and meadows across the remote, alpine Sierra Nevada landscape. We often backpack 10-20+ miles to reach study sites, and for 3-10 days we camp and work in all conditions. The field technicians spend the majority of the 2-3 month position working and living in the backcountry. Despite this challenging work environment, we are motivated by the positive impact that our research has on frog recovery.

Ecological consequences of frog declines

Read the new paper here. Published today in the journal Ecosphere, Tom, Roland, and Cherie Briggs (UC Santa Barbara) describe some of the ways in which mountain yellow-legged frog declines impact alpine lake communities. Contrary to expectations, the large scale loss of these frogs is not associated with secondary extinctions or changes in structure and composition of the benthic macroinvertebrate community, which contains most of the prey and competitor species for frogs and tadpoles. Notably, these results differ from 1) the consequences of frog declines in other ecosystems, and 2) the consequences of fish introductions in the Sierra. Although impacts of frog declines on the taxa examined in this study were small, mountain yellow-legged frog declines are associated with secondary declines in other species, like gartersnakes.